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Weekly AUDIO NEWS for June 5, 2002


Naxos Online Streaming Music Service Launches - Naxos Of America, the world's leading classical music record label, has put their entire catalog of more than 10,000 musical works online in a streaming music subscription service using the Rhapsody digital music platform from Listen.com. Naxos is the first record label to offer this. Unlike conventional MP3 downloading or streaming systems, Rhapsody uses a proprietary system combining both methods for a reliable and high fidelity audio experience. Subscribers will purchase a CD-burning license allowing them to search for, select and quickly copy ten authorized tracks per month. Rhapsody provides not only streaming music on demand but also specially-programmed Internet radio, artist discovery and music contextual information.

NXT Cardboard Speakers Launched - Those are only drawings of three speaker drivers on the front of the SoundpaX cardboard tetrahedron speakers using the NXT technology. The idea is to suggest what the triangular boxes are for; they will be available in the UK starting this summer for about £30 a pair, and are intended for informal use indoors or outdoors.

World of Headphones National Tour - Headphone specialist HeadRoom is currently on the road to 23 cities coast to coast trying to educate people that headphones can sound really good. They are showing and demonstrating the world's largest collection of headphones, headphone amps and accessories. Nearly every headphone and dedicated headphone amp combination ever made can be auditioned. The four will be in California next month and the rest of the schedule is on their website at www.headphone.com

FOX Cancels Superbowl HDTV Telecast - Fox Network is the only one of the major TV networks to announce they have abandoned HDTV, at least for now and specifically in relation to next year's Superbowl telecast. They will use a widescreen digital 480p format, similar to the image quality from a progressive scan DVD player; so it's DTV but not HDTV. No, this publication is not starting to report on sports news, but Fox's decision has broader implications than just one sports broadcast. Major events need to be covered using HDTV if the new format is to be popularized and the planned conversion to digital broadcasting completed by 2006. ABC, CBS and NBC are committed to HDTV and offering more and more programming. PBS offers occasional special HDTV programs as funding allows them.

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