• Harmonia mundi - Tokyo Quartet
  • Glass Banner - Naxos

Audio News for February 17, 2017

Your Next Home Phone May Be an Echo or Google Home – Both Amazon and Google are reportedly looking into bringing speakerphone functionality to their smart little speakers. It’s the next local step for increasingly popular devices, and one some consumers have asked for. The current roadblocks are concerns about privacy, telecom regulations, access to emergency services and user experience. The new feature could however arrive as soon as this year. Both voice-enabled devices have had a meteoric rise lately.

Epson Home Cinema for Winter Dream Staycation – The Cinema 3700 projector ($1,499) is compact and has 3000 lumens of color brightness and 3000 lumens of white for a bright images in a range of viewing environments. The 3LCD technology gives up to 3 times brighter colors. Setup is simple, with a range of placing options from a bookshelf to mounting on the ceiling. Its 1.6x zoom ensures easy installation – you can project a sharp-focus 110-inch image from just 10.5 ft. away. It supports HDMI and MHL and delivers full HD 1080p images.

Dolby Labs is Among Fast Company’s Most Innovative Consumer Electronic Companies – Its focus on innovation has led to breakthrus across its major product lines: Dolby Cinema, Dolby Atmos and Dolby Vision. Over 70 titles had been mastered now in Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos for Dolby Cinema. 12 of the movies have nominated for Academy Awards. Dolby Vision transforms the home TV experience by leveraging HDR for greater brightness and contrast as well as a fuller palette of rich colors. New products featuring these technologies will arrive in homes later this year. Consumers already have access of over 90 Hollywood titles, more than 100 hours of TV content in Dolby Vision, and more than 100 Dolby Atmos titles.

Older Classical Music Boosts Public Radio in Bulgaria – The audience for Bulgaria’s public radio station has grown by 20% since it was forced to play only old music. The company who holds the Bulgarian copyright – Musicautor – suspended its contract with Bulgarian Public Radio, demanding higher fees. It banned BNR from playing music produced since 1945. A few pieces were also “donated” to the BNR by authors who oppose the suspension. Although listeners seems to enjoy the untraditional music program, the BNR Director does not want the current situation to continue. He hoped that public interest in the classics would be satisfied by a new digital channel which should be launched by the end this year.

on this article to AUDIOPHILE AUDITION!

Email this page to a friend.

Positive SSL