Audio News for April 13, 2012

by | Apr 13, 2012 | Audio News

Samsung Launches Tubed Audio Products – Samsung is not at all recognized as an audio company, but they are hoping to change that by introducing a line of high-end tube-based audio systems. The DA-E750 tabletop audio system and the two multichannel home theater systems—HT-E6730W and HT-E6500W—utilize vacuum tube preamps with digital amps. Samsung says this combination gives the best of the analog and digital worlds. The tubes are all JJ Electronics’ 12AU7s. The tabletop system—at $799—is targeted at the audiophile-oriented shopper. It is a 2.1-channel system with a down-firing subwoofer and 100 watts of amplification. It has AirPlay, Bluetooth, and AllShare/DLNA support, and it has a USB port and aux input. It can connect wirelessly to some Samsung TVs. It has a well-constructed high-gloss cabinet in black or mahogany and the glow of the tubes is visible thru a clear top-panel window. It’s interesting that one of the top video makers in the industry is now going to campaign on behalf of higher-quality audio.
Philharmonia Orchestra “Universe of Sound” – The London Science Museum will have a special digital installation on Holst’s The Planets from May 23 to July 8, working with Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Philharmonia Orchestra. The idea is to engage new audiences with classical music in a radical and ambitious new way. Shooting the film footage required 37 cameras—believed to be the largest classical music film shoot ever. Using giant screens (some of them touch screens), unconventional surfaces to project on, movement-based interaction and planetarium-style full dome projection, the installation will allow visitors to step inside a symphony orchestra, experiencing 360-degree projections with multichannel sound, and participating in the orchestra as musicians, conductors, arrangers and composers. Salonen said “This project offers everyone, from the very young to the very old, from the absolute novice to the experienced musician, the chance to step right into the heart of one of the world’s finest symphony orchestras.”
More Interest in Multi-Screen Video – First, it should be understood that the new definition of multi-screen video no longer means multiple images on one large screen, but the use of different small mobile devices with video displays—in other words, the new demand for anytime/anywhere video. QuickPlay Media commissioned a survey which found that more people are interested in this, but have held back due to fear of the cost involved. 57% of respondents were interested in multi-screen video service, up from 48% in 2011. 35% have tried a mobile TV service, and 27% currently use them. 72% have been using them for a year or less, and 81% said they watch them more than they did a year ago.

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