Audio News for November 11, 2011

by | Nov 11, 2011 | Audio News

Partnership Allows Downloading Variety of Music For YouTube Videos – A partnership has been announced allowing consumers to edit music from the world’s largest collection of production music—as used in Avatar, Mad Men and 30 Rock—into their YouTube videos and other online videos and games. The agreement is between music licensing for social media company Rumblefish and APM Music—a joint venture of EMI Music Publishing and Universal Music Publishing, and the largest production music library in the world. Rumblefish has pre-existing partnerships with YouTube and other social media outlets where consumers can edit music from Rumblefish’s Friendly Music catalog directly into videos on those sites.
More Secure SD Cards On Way – The SD Association has announced a collaboration with GlobalPlatform to include smart-chip technology in the SD standards, enabling mobile phones and other mobile CE devices to provide authentication services in SD memory cards. The new standard has greater security than Cloud-based solutions, since the cards would only be active in an authorized device, they could transform mobile devies into electronic wallets for everyday purchases, or to receive customized subscription services. The Association is committed to a spec that is backward-compatible with all SD-enabled devices. The new cards will also support hardware encrypted voice services—a proven security method uses by emergency services, government and corporations.
First 3D Video Concert for the iPhone4 – Eagle Rock Entertainment and Spatial View Inc. have partnered to distribute Peter Gabriel’s New Blood Live in London as a glasses-free 3D download for Iphones 4 and 4s.  Toronto-based Spatial View will offer the concert on their web site next month, together with a $35 accessory—3DeeSlide—which enables people to watch 3D content glasses-free on their iPhone 4.
Internet Radio in Vehicles Via Smartphones – CSR and Livio Radio have made it possible for the new in-car infotainment systems to receive thousands of netcaster streams wirelessly from their smartphone, and be able to control and play them on their car system without the driver needing to touch a handset. They have eliminated much of the integration burden, transmitting the Internet radio streams wirelessly over a Bluetooth link from a smartphone.  It will first be available using CSR’s RoadTunes software—which creates the wireless bridge to the Livio Connect API app on the smartphone. That allows users to browse thru and control preferred content, and to do it remotely and safely.

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