Eudora Archive

MOZART & CHOPIN: “Dialogue” – Josep Colom, p. – Eudora

MOZART & CHOPIN: “Dialogue” – Josep Colom, p. – Eudora

MOZART & CHOPIN: “Dialogue” – Josep Colom, p. – Eudora multichannel SACD 1404, 79:09 (2/10/16) ****½: A recital that bridges the aesthetic worlds of Mozart and Chopin. We need not succumb to mystical nonsense to believe that great works of art can communicate with one another over time. There are convergent notions at work in the most enduring aesthetic achievements. We see this all the more in individuals of like sensibilities. Aristotle, who believed in the intelligibility of nature and ably delineated the methods of science, could easily converse with Nobel prize-winning scientists of today. In music, too, it is rewarding to think of musical affinities which defy time. The present recording does just this sort of imagining and allows two such figures to meet and hold up a mirror one to the other: Mozart and Chopin. Josep Colom is a veteran Spanish pianist, renowned for his recordings of De Falla, Mompou and Brahms. He is a teacher and jury-member for the Chopin Piano Competition. On this recording, he surely enjoys the finest sound engineering of his career as he debuts for a small but outstanding Madrid-based audiophile label, Eudora. We were suitably impressed with this label’s issue of Haydn […]

BACH: The Cello Suites, arr. by Valter Despalj – Petrit Ceku, guitar – Eudora

BACH: The Cello Suites, arr. by Valter Despalj – Petrit Ceku, guitar – Eudora

J.S. BACH: The Cello Suites, arr. by Valter Despalj – Petrit Ceku, guitar – Eudora multichannel SACD 1602 – CD 1: 58: 57, CD 2: 74:31 (5/6/16) *****: The cello suites in spectacular hi-res surround sound recorded on guitar in new arrangements by Valter Despalj. It is with great anticipation that one sits down to take in a guitar recital of the complete Bach Cello Suites by Croatian guitarist Petrit Ceku released by Eudora on SACD. One is always a bit nervous about one’s seat. Too far back and we are with the snoozers who need to be jogged awake. And yet it is awkward, impolite even, to be seated too close; some recordings thrust your head into the very sound-hole of the instrument.  But with the first almost too well-known Prelude in G major, we realize with joy that we are ideally positioned in row 6, seat M, in a smallish recital hall with medium-dry acoustic. The balance between the upper end of the guitar and the low E is graciously achieved, while the amber hues of the middle-range are superbly nuanced and affecting. The instrument by Ross Gutmeier is well-behaved in all registers, and yet it is not […]