Fender Rhodes Archive

Ron Boustead – Unlikely Valentine – Art-Rock Music

Ron Boustead – Unlikely Valentine – Art-Rock Music

Ron Boustead – Unlikely Valentine – Art-Rock Music, 43:56 ***: A tasty treat. (Ron Boustead – vocals; Bill Cunliffe – piano, Fender Rhodes; Hammond B-3; Mitchel Forman – piano, Fender Rhodes, Hammond B-3, accordion; John Leftwich – acoustic bass; Jake Reed – drums, percussion; Pat Kelley – acoustic & electric guitar; Bob Sheppard – saxes, flute; Bob McChesney – trombone; Ron Stout – Flugelhorn; Fabiana Passoni – vocal track 5) Who was Ron Boustead’s Unlikely Valentine? A review of the set list from his latest release does not provide any clues. Nevertheless, Boustead’s lively vocals through both the covers and original compositions from this album will be welcomed by his devotees. Backed by a full-throated stylish band, Boustead dives into the tunes with an uncanny reflection of singer Mark Murphy. The opening title track “Unlikely Valentine” was written by pianist Bill Cunliffe based on the chord changes of My Funny Valentine with lyrics from Ron Boustead. It is a rousing bebop styled number, with a husky vocals from the artist. Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller began their song-writing careers in Los Angeles and eventually became one of popular music’s songwriting legends. “Love Potion No. 9” was originally recorded in 1959 […]

Dave Douglas and Frank Woeste – Dada People – Greenleaf

Dave Douglas and Frank Woeste – Dada People – Greenleaf

Making music for Man Ray’s masterful art. Dave Douglas and Frank Woeste – Dada People [TrackList follows] – Greenleaf GRE-CD-1051, 63:14 [10/14/16] ****: (Dave Douglas – trumpet, co-producer; Frank Woeste – piano, Fender Rhodes, co-producer; Matt Brewer – bass; Clarence Penn – drums) Want to appreciate an artist’s efforts in a fresh way? Then try experiencing a person’s creativity filtered through another artist’s imagination. That’s the impetus behind the hour-long Dada People, the collaboration by trumpeter Dave Douglas and keyboardist Frank Woeste, alongside bassist Matt Brewer and drummer Clarence Penn. Douglas and Woeste set about penning music which offers a musical viewpoint focusing on famed artist Man Ray, who fashioned paintings, photography, “ready-mades” and other artistic endeavors (both commercial and non-commercial) and was a significant contributor to the Dada and Surrealist movements, though not formally a member of those groups. The ten original tracks (which are credited equally: five Douglas and five Woeste compositions) impart audio portraits but not always directly related to Man Ray’s creative output. Douglas states the material deliberately engages in the “spirit of mischievousness, of play, of mystery, and also of the ‘play of identity’ within the work of Ray and his circle.” That sphere of […]

Carol Robbins, harp – Taylor Street – Jazzcats

Carol Robbins, harp – Taylor Street – Jazzcats

A welcome jazz harp with ensemble release… Carol Robbins, harp – Taylor Street – Jazzcats 109, 53:49 ****: (Carol Robbins – harp; Billy Childs – piano and Fender Rhodes; Bob Sheppard – saxophones and clarinet; Larry Koonse – guitar; Curtis Taylor – trumpet; Derek Oles – bass; Gary Novak – drums; Ben Shepherd – electric bass) There is a lushness to the jazz harp with ensemble release, Taylor Street, from harp player Carol Robbins, that will draw listeners in immediately, and demand further replays to fully appreciate its harmonic richness. Robbins studied with the pre-eminent jazz harpist, Dorothy Ashby, and she explores the harp’s strengths as a lead instrument backed by top L.A. session men on nine of her original compositions. Certainly it’s the lyrical bliss inducing aura brought on by a full size concert harp that begins the process. Billy Childs’ piano and Fender Rhodes expands the landscape with his Jazz Chamber Ensemble mates, Bob Sheppard on sax and clarinet, and guitarist, Larry Koonse. The burnished tone of trumpeter Curtis Taylor rounds out the front line, backed by bass and drums. The nine tracks are a blend of heated jazz, bluesy riffs, and a strong dose of classical motifs […]

The Stryker/Slagle Band Expanded – Routes – Strikezone

The Stryker/Slagle Band Expanded – Routes – Strikezone

A jazz journey from two artists who’ve been there, done that. The Stryker/Slagle Band Expanded – Routes [TrackList follows] – Strikezone 8813, 50:16 [2/5/16] ****: (Dave Stryker – guitar, co-producer; Steve Slagle – alto saxophone, soprano saxophone (track 2), flute (tracks 2, 6), horn arranger, co-producer; John Clark – French horn; Billy Drewes – tenor saxophone, bass clarinet (tracks 2, 3); Clark Gayton – trombone, tuba (tracks 3, 6); Bill O’Connell – piano, Fender Rhodes (tracks 2, 5-6); Gerald Cannon – bass; McClenty Hunter – drums) On the 50-minute Routes, frequent musical allies, friends and co-leaders Dave Stryker (guitar) and Steve Slagle (saxes, flute) explore journeys from place to place, past to present, and person to person. The two have collaborated for decades on each other’s projects, in other people’s groups, and as the mainstays of the Stryker/Slagle Band. This time around, Slagle and Stryker have lots to say about areas they’ve called home, musicians they’ve performed with or met along the way, and the passage from their past to their present. That spacious viewpoint also means an enlarged ensemble was needed, thus this nine-track outing utilizes the Stryker/Slagle Band Expanded. One tune features Slagle and Stryker’s traditional quartet setting, […]