producer Archive

Bobby Avey – Inhuman Wilderness – Innervoice Jazz

Bobby Avey – Inhuman Wilderness – Innervoice Jazz

The human condition becomes musically portrayed on pianist Bobby Avey’s latest. Bobby Avey – Inhuman Wilderness [TrackList follows] – Innervoice Jazz IVJ 102, 45:43 [6/24/16] ****: (Bobby Avey – piano, producer; John O’Gallagher – alto saxophone (tracks 2-3, 6, 8); Thomson Kneeland – bass; Jordan Perlson – drums) It may not be readily apparent when listening to pianist Bobby Avey’s fifth album, Inhuman Wilderness, but Avey has produced a record replete with concept, specifically the tragedy of man’s inhumanity to fellow men and also to the world/nature around them. Avey’s eight originals (which range from over nine minutes long to under two minutes) cover topics such as American military drone operations in the Middle East, to the unwritten stories of people who form the fabric of historical events; from the disproportionate costs of gentrification and escalating rents, to the need for societal changes. Since this 45-minute project has no vocals—this is quartet jazz music, not a spoken word or lyric-driven achievement—Avey and his band convey and communicate via musical cues, themes and stimuli. Avey’s eloquence, compassion and occasional indignation can be heard from start to finish, and are brought into focus by his new quartet: bassist Thomson Kneeland and drummer […]

PROKOFIEV: Piano Concertos Nos. 2 & 5 – Vadym Kholodenko p./ Fort Worth Sym./ Miguel Harth-Bedoya – Harmonia mundi

PROKOFIEV: Piano Concertos Nos. 2 & 5 – Vadym Kholodenko p./ Fort Worth Sym./ Miguel Harth-Bedoya – Harmonia mundi

PROKOFIEV: Piano Concertos Nos. 2 & 5 – Vadym Kholodenko p./ Fort Worth Sym./ Miguel Harth-Bedoya – Harmonia mundi multichannel SACD HMU-807631, 57:03 (2/5/16) **** (performance) **1/2 (recording): A dynamic performance of two Prokofiev concertos with disappointing recorded sound. Winner of the gold medal in the 2013 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, Vadym Kholodenko has impressed audiences around the world and particularly in Texas where he serves as Artist in Partnership with the Fort Worth Symphony.  This SACD presents Kholodenko with Miguel Harth-Bedoya and the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra in a pair of piano concertos by Sergey Prokofiev that clearly showcase Kholodenko’s skills.  This SACD is the first in a projected Prokofiev cycle. The disc contains the Second Piano Concerto (1913) and Prokofiev’s Fifth Piano Concerto written almost 20 years later. The Second is well known, the Fifth less so. The performances are precise and dynamic. I’ve only heard a few performances of the Fort Worth Symphony, but they perform ably here. These are both challenging compositions, but they did not defeat the orchestra or the soloist. The recording is not a bad one, but not a standout either. Admittedly, how something is recorded is a matter of taste, but […]

Dave Wilson Quartet – There Was Never – Zoho

Dave Wilson Quartet – There Was Never – Zoho

Saxophonist Wilson effortlessly moves from emotional aspects to abstract elements. Dave Wilson Quartet – There Was Never [TrackList follows] – Zoho ZM 201512, 65:33 (11/6/15) ****: (Dave Wilson – tenor, soprano saxophone, producer; Bobby Avey – piano; Tony Marino – acoustic bass; Alex Ritz – drums) When it’s cool outside, you can warm up with saxophonist Dave Wilson. Wilson’s latest outing, the hour-long There Was Never, arrives five years after his previous effort, Spiral (2010), and as usual his music boils and simmers, and is always as embracing as a hot toddy or heated apple cider (or wassail). On Spiral, Wilson led a quartet through scintillating originals and atypical covers. Wilson follows a similar path with his new material, which comprises six originals and three interpretive tracks. This time, Wilson uses pianist Bobby Avey, drummer Alex Ritz and bassist Tony Marino (who was on Spiral). Ritz, Avey and Marino are also members of Dave Liebman’s Expansions band, which means there’s a lot of simpatico communication. There’s plenty of instinctive liveliness on the seven-minute opener, “The Time Has Come,” which is fronted by Wilson’s commanding tenor sax. If a listener thinks of Trane, there’s a reason. Wilson acknowledges in the liner […]