Ragazze Quartet Archive

TERRY RILEY: Four Four Three – Ragazze Quartet/ Slagwerk den Haag/ Kapok – Channel Classics

TERRY RILEY: Four Four Three – Ragazze Quartet/ Slagwerk den Haag/ Kapok – Channel Classics

A program of music by the American minimalist composer Terry Riley, newly arranged with a jazz trio and more. TERRY RILEY: Four Four Three – Ragazze Quartet/ Slagwerk den Haag/ Kapok – Channel Classics CCS 37816, 57:30 (6/10/16) ****: The first 3/4 of this unusual CD features Riley’s original work of over 50 years ago, In C, which was probably the most important example of ‘repetitive music.’ There have been several recordings since which attempted to pay tribute to this important work which sort of mixed classical and jazz. According to one of the liner note writers, the worst example he has heard tries to copy the original performance, and “Rules are not as important as results.” This version is totally different by using both the Ragazze String Quartet and four percussionists who go by the Slagwerk den Haag name. There’s an enormous dynamic range (no vinyl medium could possible handle this) and in addition to this explosiveness there is often a feeling of tranquil quiet and relaxation. For the closing Sunrise of the planetary dream collector, a third group is brought in to join the other two. It is the jazz trio Kapok who use electronic effects and other […]

“Cesko” – Works of SCHULHOFF, & DVORAK – Ragazze Q. – Channel Classics

“Cesko” – Works of SCHULHOFF, & DVORAK – Ragazze Q. – Channel Classics

“Česko” = ERWIN SCHULHOFF: String Quartet No. 1; DVOŘÁK: String Quartet No. 13 in G Major, Op. 106; SCHULHOFF: Esquisses de jazz (arr. Leonard Evers) – Ragazze Quartet – Channel Classics multichannel SACD CCS SA 36815, 65:00 [Distr. Harmonia mundi] (5/15/15) ****: A very attractive program of Bohemian yin and yang. The “young Dutch/British” Ragzze Quartet here presents a program that is obviously dear to their hearts. And if it doesn’t quite seem to mesh as you think about it, both composers are Bohemian (hence the title Česko, the popular Eastern-European nickname for Bohemia), and both tap into the folk traditions of their native land though in very different ways. At the same time, both are cosmopolitan composers whose musical influences came as much from abroad as from their homeland. Erwin Schulhoff was born in Prague of a German-Jewish family. As a child, he met and was encouraged in his musical studies by none other than Dvořák, entering the Prague Conservatory before moving on to Leipzig and Paris, where Schullhoff studied with both Max Reger and Claude Debussy. Quite a musical mix, which certainly influenced his music making. Following service on the Eastern Front during World War I, Schulhoff traveled […]