Rarities Archive

The Music Treasury for 2 December 2018 — Sir Thomas Beecham

The Music Treasury for 2 December 2018 — Sir Thomas Beecham

The Music Treasury will feature “rarities” by conductor Sir Thomas Beecham, a distinctive and so significant figure in this past century.  The show airs from 19:00 to 21:00 PST on Stanford’s KZSU, with concurrent streaming online from kzsu.stanford.edu.  As always, the show is hosted by Dr Gary Lemco. Sir Thomas Beecham (1879-1961): Rarities [From Wikipedia] Thomas Beecham was born in 1879 in St. Helens, Lancashire, in the north of England. He was self-taught as a conductor. He had some private composition lessons from Charles Wood in London and from Moszkowski in Paris. Beecham’s father, Sir Joseph Beecham, had made a reasonable fortune making medicines (the famous Beecham pills), and he liked music, so he was able to help Thomas in his chosen career as a musician. Thomas was 20 years old when his father was reinstated as mayor of St. Helens. To celebrate this event, his father paid for the Hallé Orchestra to give a concert. It was to be conducted by the famous German conductor, Hans Richter. However, a few days before the concert, it was announced that Richter was ill. Thomas immediately said he would conduct the concert. The orchestra at first refused to play for a 20-year-old […]

“MAHLER Rarities” = Symphony No. 2 in c minor “Resurrection”: Andante moderato; Sym. No. 4 – Soloists/ Hilversum Radio Philharmonic/ Paul van Kempen – Pristine Audio

“MAHLER Rarities” = Symphony No. 2 in c minor “Resurrection”: Andante moderato; Sym. No. 4 – Soloists/ Hilversum Radio Philharmonic/ Paul van Kempen – Pristine Audio

The Mahler legacy adds two rare documents of innate interest to the history of recorded sound.  “MAHLER Rarities” = Symphony No. 2 in c minor “Resurrection”: Andante moderato only; Sym. No. 4 in G Major – Cadillac Sym. Orch./ Arnold Schoenberg (Sym. No. 2)/ Corry Bijster, sop./ Hilversum Radio Philharmonic Orch./ Paul van Kempen – Pristine Audio PASC 466, 62:08 [avail. in var. formats from www.pristineclassical.com] *****:  Restoration engineer and producer Mark Obert-Thorn revives two significant documents for Mahler acolytes: the NBC broadcast (8 April 1934) of composer Arnold Schoenberg’s appearance before a pseudonym ensemble – likely members of the Blue Network Orchestra – leading music by the very composer who had championed his own scores in turn-of-the-century Vienna. The other, the G Major Symphony (January 1950) from the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam led by Paul van Kempen (1893-1955), a former violinist under Willem Mengelberg who himself enjoyed a strong career in Dresden, Hilversum, and Berlin. The Schoenberg recording – in music other than his own – impresses us with its stylistic sympathy for a movement fraught with a pantheistic fervor and touched by nostalgia. A small break in the recording suggests that a change to another shellac disc had been required […]