Audio News for October 11, 2005

by | Oct 11, 2005 | Audio News | 0 comments

More Education Needed for Wi-Fi to Take Off – A recent
survey of U.S. consumers revealed that while existing home networks
are  split between Ethernet wired connections and wireless
Wi-Fi/Airport, future home networks will be predominantly Wi-Fi. The
challenge is to educate consumers about Wi-Fi, including that it is
more than just a data networking technology. Wi-Fi silicon vendors
believe that Wi-Fi connectivity in consumer electronics devices will
build to a major market segment over the next five years.

Intel Short Films Contest – The Intel Indies Film Contest calls
on video and animation directors to create shorts on a specific theme,
awarding $45,000 can and home electronics equipment to winners. Films
must use the theme of “magic wand” and an Intel processor must be part
of the production process (that leaves Mac users out until next year).
The judges panel will include Intel staff plus Hollywood directors and
film experts. AtomFilms.com will promote the contest and display the
winners. The site has conducted similar “branded entertainment” efforts
in the past with Lucasfilm, Sony, Honda and HP.

Volvo First to Offer Dolby Pro Logic II in Their Vehicles
Volvo is the first car manufacturers to offer Dolby Pro Logic II
technology in all of their 2006 vehicles. The option will provide a
realistic surround sound experience from any two-channel stereo
content, to simulate a home theater surround experience on the road.
Pro Logic II is an advanced matrix surround technology, providing five
full-bandwidth channels of surround sound playback, and is also
incorporated in millions of products such as PCs and home AV receivers
and preamps.

Overrated Lo-Fi Recordings – Nick Blakey, a Boston-based writer
and musician, takes to task punk rock musicians creating noise and
selling it as inspired experimentation. “Why have we been subjected to
indie rock’s flood of low-fi waste starting in the late 1980s? The
sudden availability of affordable and easy-to-use recording equipment,
with the upsurge in independent music was a double-edged sword. Now
anyone with a few bucks could record whatever and whenever they
wanted…Releasing badly-recorded music was considered cool and a major
blow to the progress of modern sound…Guitars tend to not sound
exactly great when they appear to be broadcasting from inside a trash
can under water, as do distorted drums bleeding into every single
track.”

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